Delay: Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players

Delay: Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players

Blog, Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players, Presets and Sounds
Delay can add a lot by doing a little. Admittedly this post transformed into to something different then I intended as I explored the Ping Pong Delay. In all of this, my passion is using the software as a piece of my instrument. When an electric guitar player plugs into their pedal board, the board is no less a part of their instrument than the guitar. As a keyboard player, how do I use my software the same way? This is a question I ask myself often. This post comes from that place. And I know you are going to love this approach to using delay. https://youtu.be/WoMH5YHi0eA What is Delay? Delay is an audio effect that takes a part of your signal, and repeats it after a given amount of…
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Ableton’s Metronome: Everything You Need To Know

Ableton’s Metronome: Everything You Need To Know

Blog, Program Features
Using a metronome is a daily task for many of us. We use it when we record, when we are playing live, when we are creating, when we are practicing music, when we are mowing the lawn... The list goes on and on. Today we are going to take an in-depth look at Ableton Live's built-in metronome to see how it works, check out its features, and get the most out of it. Ableton's Metronome First things first, we gotta find this thing! Ableton's metronome is located at the top left-hand corner of the screen.   If the metronome is greyed out, it is off, and it if its colored in than it is on. Metronome Sounds Ableton's metronome offers three different sounds to choose from. They can all be accessed by clicking on the…
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Abletons Browser: Preset, or Default?

Abletons Browser: Preset, or Default?

Blog, Program Features, Transition Essentials
I recently had a friend in town who makes great music in Logic but has never touched Ableton before. As he was working on Ableton with me, one of the first questions he asked was, "Are there preset options?" And hence, this post. https://youtu.be/N69sUcHk348 Ableton's Browser Ableton's browser is organized by folders and is located on the left-hand side of your user interface. I think the browser actually makes it very easy to find things once you understand how it works. To the very top left is the show/hide browser triangle that lets you hide the browser when you don't need to see it. Just below that is your list of categories. I like to think of this section in plain English as things that can be added to your set by…
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Creating Curved Automation In Ableton Live

Creating Curved Automation In Ableton Live

Blog, Live Playback, Program Features, Recording
Curved automation lines are a great way to add a more human-like feel to your automation envelopes. It can also help to create feelings of great anticipation by not only gradually changing a parameter but also gradually changing the speed of change. What is Automation? In the context of DAW software, automation is when a particular parameter is changed over the course of the song timeline. Automation is actually one of the reasons that I ended up switching to Ableton for my live performance use. I was able to create a bank of effects using automation that lined up with my timeline. This included things like filter movement, patch changing, reverb and delay amounts, distortion and panning. Ableton also allows you to unlink automation from notes or audio in a given…
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Transpose Audio, Preserve Tempo

Transpose Audio, Preserve Tempo

Blog, Live Playback, Program Features, Recording
Manipulating audio in Ableton is absolutely the best. It makes changing speed, pitch, warping and slicing totally painless. Today our focus is going to on how to transpose audio in Ableton while preserving the speed. This, like most audio manipulating functions in Ableton, es exceptionally simple. The resulting audio also maintains very high quality. In most cases, it's difficult to tell the audio has been transposed to begin with. Unless of course, you want to make it sound totally processed, Ableton does that well too. But that's for another time. https://youtu.be/HBvc_qapmdg Transposing Audio Clips Once audio is brought into Ableton, It is ready to be transposed. All of the transposition controls can be found in the sample editor dialogue box in the clip view at the bottom of your screen. There…
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Simple Guide To Installing VST’s for Ableton

Simple Guide To Installing VST’s for Ableton

Blog
In all ways, I am a major fan of Ableton's built-in sound shaping tools. I actually think their collection of Synth's, and audio effects are basically complete. Often times, not enough credit is given to how great they are... This may be an intro for a different blog post. Chances are, you have decided at some point to welcome some third-party plug-ins into your Ableton arsenal. Many of these, particularly the ones you purchase, come with installers. So as soon as you open them up, they automatically go to the right place and you are ready to roll as soon as you restart Ableton. This article is not about that either. Today we are dealing with 3rd Party VST's that are sort of rogue and off the beaten path. I'm talking about the…
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Use Ableton Like Mainstage

Use Ableton Like Mainstage

Blog, Transition Essentials, Uncategorized
I need to start out by saying, Ableton is not MainStage. It does however have the ability to do all of the same things, and way more. MainStage is created to play patches. Ableton is created partially to play patches, and partially as a program for music production. You can think of Ableton as Logic Pro, but with integrated features that allow for playing and switching patches in real time. The Six Stages Of A Patch List Phase One: Get Familiar with the song Pay special attention specifically to... What types of sounds are used.Where where sounds sit on the keyboard.Sections that will need extra programming to execute. (I.e. chord triggers, pitch shifting and the like) Phase Two: Choose your sounds Before you start building a patch list, you will…
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Preset spotlight: Light Keys

Preset spotlight: Light Keys

Blog, Presets and Sounds, Recording
I have found in my talking with people about Ableton that there are a lot of people who hate on Ableton's preset sounds, and even on their built-in synths and instruments. It's my personal opinion that the somewhat lack-luster looks of many of its synths contribute to some users gripes with their sounds. I will concede that there are other DAW's that have some shinier out of the box sounds, but I can offer an immediate explanation for this. Ableton is modular in nature. Sounds and effects are meant to be layered, stacked, and used in combination to create awesome things. So for where certain routing abilities are in lack or effects missing within the synth itself, there are innumerable possibilities for sound and effect layering that quickly make up for…
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Lowpass Filter: Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players

Lowpass Filter: Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players

Blog, Essential Audio Effects For Keyboard Players, Live Playback
A filter can do a lot to sound. You can think about it much like an EQ. As a matter of fact, an EQ is capable of many of the sound shaping functions that the auto filter is capable of. So what is the main difference? I like to think of an EQ as a way to mold a sound that you like to fit in with the other sounds that are happening. It is designed to be more of a mixing tool than an audio effect. I like to think of a filter as a way to drastically change the sound for artistic effect. It has more to do with what a specific sound will be sound like, than how it fits with the rest of the track. The…
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Warping Audio In Ableton

Warping Audio In Ableton

Blog, Live Playback, Recording
Warping audio is the process of lining up imported music or samples with Ableton's grid. I most commonly use this when I am trying to learn a solo by ear. Being able to speed something up and slow it down along with a click is a very helpful tool for me. How It's Done With Warp mode enabled, Ableton looks at audio and tried to use the transients to guess where beats may line up. You are then able to go in and using transient markers, or by dragging the suggested markers, you are able to line up the audio with Ableton's grid. It is important to note that double-clicking a transient will create a marker. So if you are 100% sure that a particular part of the wave belongs…
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